Saiks Beko Agreement

The agreement was drawn up and negotiated by the country`s diplomats over the next few months and signed by the Allies between 18 August and 26 September 1917. [38] Russia was not represented in this agreement because the Tsarist regime was in the midst of a revolution. The lack of Russian approval of the Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne agreement was then used by the British at the 1919 Paris Peace Conference to invalidate it, a position that greatly outraged the Italian government. [41] The agreement effectively divided the Ottoman provinces outside the Arabian Peninsula into territories of control and influence of the United Kingdom and France. The countries controlled by Great Britain and France were divided by the Sykes-Picot line. [5] The agreement that gave Britain control of present-day southern Israel and Palestine, Jordan and southern Iraq, as well as another small area including the ports of Haifa and Acre, to allow access to the Mediterranean. [6] [7] [8] France should control southeastern Turkey, northern Iraq, Syria and Lebanon. [8] Following the agreement between Sazonov and Paleologist, Russia should also receive Western Armenia alongside Constantinople and the Turkish Strait, already promised under the 1915 Constantinople Convention. [8] Italy was closed to the Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne Convention in 1917 and received South Anatolia.

[8] The Palestinian region, whose territory is smaller than later compulsory Palestine, should be under “international administration.” The memorandum was forwarded to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and circulated for notice. On 16 January, Sykes informed the Ministry of Foreign Affairs that he had spoken to Picot and that he thought Paris could agree. On 21 January, Nicolson convened an inter-departmental conference. Following the meeting, a draft final agreement was circulated to cabinet on 2 February and was reviewed by the War Committee on 3 February. Finally, in a meeting on the 4th between Bonar Law, Chamberlain, Lord Kitchener and others, it was decided that the French, after the Constantinople agreement, would approach the British to develop their mutual desiderata and the British. On 8 April 1915, the De Bunsen Committee was set up to examine British options. [45] Zionism was not taken into account in the June 1915 Committee report,[46] which concluded that in the event of division or zone of influence, there must be a British sphere of influence that included Palestine, while accepting that there be relevant French and Russian interests, as well as Islamic interests, in Jerusalem and in the holy places. [47] [48] More than a year after the agreement with Russia, British and French representatives, Sir Mark Sykes and François Georges Picot, drafted another secret agreement on the future prey of the Great War. Picot represented a small group determined to ensure control of Syria for France; For his part, Sykes asked the UK to compensate for the influence in the region. The agreement did not allow, to a large extent, the future growth of Arab nationalism, which the British government and army wanted to use at the same time for their advantage vis-à-vis the Turks.